New Govt system signals death of the household phonebook

closeThis article could be out of date, as it was published 8 months 9 days ago.

Households can now stop getting phone books delivered, following Government approval for a new opt-out system, Communications and Information Technology Minister and Environment Minister Amy Adams has announced.

Adams has told Yellow, the company which puts together the phone books, it can offer households the ability to opt out of receiving a phone book from 2015.

“In an increasingly digital age, it makes sense to offer people a choice about whether they still want to receive a printed phone book,” Adams says.

“Given a choice, many New Zealanders appear comfortable with finding the information they need electronically, and do not require a printed directory.

“There are environmental benefits too. If just 5 per cent of households opt out, that means there will be about 175,000 fewer books delivered every year.

“This could potentially save about 150 tonnes of paper a year just by households making the most of technology and doing things smarter.”

The decision by Yellow to offer households the ability to opt out of receiving a phone book follows consultation with the Government, and is in line with the Telecommunications Services Obligations for local residential services.

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